The Facts About School Funding in Western Australia

Total government funding per student in Western Australian private schools adjusted for inflation (“real funding”) increased by nearly $1,200 per student between 2009 and 2017 while funding for public schools was cut by even more than the private school increases. During the Gonski funding period of 2013-2017 funding for public schools was cut but increased for private schools.

While the Western Australian Government increased current dollar funding of public schools between 2009 and 2017, it cut real funding by an incredible $1,575 (-13.7%) per student. In the Gonski funding period it cut public school funding by $737 (-6.9%) per student. The cuts mean that public schools have far fewer human and material resources per student.

The Western Australian Government took the opportunity of increased Commonwealth funding for public schools to cut its own real funding of public schools.

Government funding increases have been badly mis-directed in favouring the more privileged, better-off school sectors and students. Nearly 90% of disadvantaged students in Western Australia are in public schools.

Continue reading “The Facts About School Funding in Western Australia”

The Facts About School Funding in Queensland

Total government funding per student in Queensland private schools adjusted for inflation (“real funding”) increased by over three times that for public schools between 2009 and 2017. Even during the Gonski funding period of 2013-2017 the funding increase for private schools was over double that for public schools.

While the Queensland Government increased current dollar funding of public schools between 2009 and 2017, it cut real funding by $211 (-2.5%) per student. In the Gonski funding period it cut public school funding by $340 (-3.9%) per student. The cuts mean that public schools have fewer human and material resources per student.

As in the case of most other states, the Queensland Government took the opportunity of increased Commonwealth funding for public schools to cut its own real funding of public schools while increasing funding for private schools.

Government funding increases have been badly mis-directed in favouring the more privileged, better-off school sectors and students. About 87% of disadvantaged students in Queensland are in public schools and 89% of disadvantaged schools are public schools.

Continue reading “The Facts About School Funding in Queensland”

Skulduggery by the Morrison & Andrews Governments Robs Victorian Public Schools of Billions

The new funding agreement between the Commonwealth and Victorian Governments signed last month will rob the state’s public schools of billions over the next ten years. Cumulative under-funding will amount to over $17 billion by 2028. As with the other Commonwealth/State agreements, the Victorian agreement is heavily biased against public schools and in favour of private schools. Public schools will be under-funded indefinitely while private schools will be fully funded by 2023.

Continue reading “Skulduggery by the Morrison & Andrews Governments Robs Victorian Public Schools of Billions”

The Facts About School Funding in Victoria

Total government funding per student in Victorian private schools adjusted for inflation (“real funding”) increased by over $1,500 per student between 2009 and 2017 while funding for public schools was cut. Government funding of public schools increased during the Gonski funding period of 2013-2017, but it was significantly less than the increase for private schools.

Commonwealth Government funding increases massively favoured private schools in both periods. The Victorian Government cut real funding of public schools by $530 (-6.8%) per student between 2009 and 2013. It increased real funding in the Gonski period, but not sufficiently to offset the earlier cut. As a result, public schools had far fewer human and material resources per student in 2017 than in 2009 and far less than available in private schools.

Government funding increases have been badly mis-directed in favouring the more privileged, better-off school sectors and students. Over 80% of disadvantaged students in Victoria are in public schools and nearly 90% of disadvantaged schools are public schools.

Continue reading “The Facts About School Funding in Victoria”

The Facts About School Funding in NSW

Total government funding per student in NSW private schools adjusted for inflation (“real funding”) increased by over seven times that for public schools between 2009 and 2017. Even during the Gonski funding period of 2013-2017 the funding increase for private schools was three times that for public schools.

While the NSW Government increased current dollar funding of public schools between 2013 and 2017, it failed to cover rising costs. Real funding was cut by $202 (-2.4%) per student after cutting funding by $394 (-4.4%) per student between 2009 and 2013. It means public schools have fewer human and material resources per student.

The NSW Government took the opportunity of increased Commonwealth funding for public schools to cut its own real funding of public schools while maintaining funding for private schools.

Government funding increases have been badly misdirected in favouring the more privileged, better-off school sectors and students. About 85% of disadvantaged students in NSW are in public schools and 96% of disadvantaged schools are public schools.

Continue reading “The Facts About School Funding in NSW”

The Facts About School Funding in Australia

This is a summary of a new Education Research Paper published by Save Our Schools. It can be downloaded below.

New figures show that total government funding per student in public schools adjusted for inflation (“real funding”) was cut between 2009 and 2017 while funding for Catholic and Independent schools increased massively. Even during the Gonski funding period of 2013-2017 the funding increase for private schools was over three times the increase for public schools.

Continue reading “The Facts About School Funding in Australia”

More Studies Show That Money Really Does Matter in Education

Three new US studies have found that increasing funding for disadvantaged students increases school results. They bring to 21 the number of studies in the last five years showing that funding increases targeted at disadvantaged students improves achievement. This is a remarkable degree of unanimity amongst education economists. Even notorious sceptics of the worth of increasing school spending such as Professor Eric Hanushek from Stanford University (USA) and The Economist magazine have been forced to concede that money matters for disadvantaged students.

Continue reading “More Studies Show That Money Really Does Matter in Education”

School vouchers expand despite evidence of negative effects

For the past couple of decades, proponents of vouchers for private schools have been pushing the idea that vouchers work.

They assert there is a consensus among researchers that voucher programs lead to learning gains for students – in some cases bigger gains than with other reforms and approaches, such as class-size reduction.

They have highlighted studies that show the positive impact of vouchers on various populations. At the very least, they argue, vouchers do no harm.

As researchers who study school choice and education policy, we see a new consensus emerging — including in pro-voucher advocates’ own studies — that vouchers are having mostly no effects or negative effects on student learning. As a result, we see a shift in how voucher proponents are redefining what voucher success represents. They are using a new set of non-academic gains that were not the primary argument to promote vouchers.

Continue reading “School vouchers expand despite evidence of negative effects”

How Money Matters

The following is a summary of a new report from the Learning Policy Institute in the United States on school finance reform. It reviews reforms by four US states to undertake progressive school funding strategies in order to substantially improve learning opportunities for all students. It provides recommendations for federal and state policies to address funding inequalities that contribute to the cycle of poverty. It shows that money matters when it comes to improving schools and that how money is spent is critical.

Continue reading “How Money Matters”