The SES Private School Funding Model Has Failed

After ten years the SES model of funding private schools has failed. It has failed to stem massive fee increases in elite private schools. It has diverted millions and millions of dollars in taxpayer funds to schools least in need while those most in need are denied adequate funding. It has meant that elite private schools have become more exclusive. Continue reading “The SES Private School Funding Model Has Failed”

Fee and Funding Increases Give Elite Private Schools a Massive Resource Advantage

Australia’s wealthiest private schools have become more exclusive over the past decade, despite receiving millions in Federal Government funding which is supposed to make them more accessible. Fee and funding increases for these schools have far exceeded funding increases for government schools. With the aid of generous funding by the Federal Government elite private schools have double or more the resources of government schools. Continue reading “Fee and Funding Increases Give Elite Private Schools a Massive Resource Advantage”

Catholic Submission to the School Funding Review Makes Important Concessions

The National Catholic Education Commission’s submission to the school funding review makes for interesting reading. It makes two very important concessions. First, the Commission has finally conceded that the student population of Catholic schools has a higher socio-economic status (SES) than government schools. Second, the submission acknowledges that the official statistics on school expenditure over-state government school expenditure in comparison with private schools. Continue reading “Catholic Submission to the School Funding Review Makes Important Concessions”

No Compelling Research Evidence For School Autonomy

School autonomy is yet another of Julia Gillard’s education initiatives to be found wanting for a sound research base. A recent review of research studies has found there is no compelling evidence to support giving autonomy for principals in hiring and firing teachers and for financial management of schools. Continue reading “No Compelling Research Evidence For School Autonomy”

OECD Study Shows that School Autonomy is no Silver Bullet

The Gillard Government’s claim that giving schools greater responsibility for budgets and hiring teachers will improve student achievement is repudiated by the latest results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). An OECD report analysing cross-country results from PISA 2009 shows that schools which have control over budgets and the hiring and firing of teachers do not achieve better results.

However, the report does show that education systems in which schools which have greater control over curriculum and student assessment do achieve better results. This finding raises a question as to whether the introduction of the national curriculum in Australia could preclude possible gains from greater school autonomy in curriculum and assessment. Continue reading “OECD Study Shows that School Autonomy is no Silver Bullet”

Learning from Finland

The latest results from the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) reveal that Finland has once again outperformed Australia and other countries which have resorted to market-based approaches to education. Finland achieved higher average results and much lower differences in results between rich and poor than Australia, England and the United States.

Continue reading “Learning from Finland”

PISA Study Says that Competition Between Schools Lowers Student Achievement in Australia

A report analysing cross-country results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) shows that competition between schools in Australia lowers average results in reading by over six months of schooling. It also shows that across all OECD countries competition for enrolments does not produce better results. Continue reading “PISA Study Says that Competition Between Schools Lowers Student Achievement in Australia”

Comprehensive School Systems Do Better Than Selective Systems

A cross-country analysis of the results of the OECD’s 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) shows that school systems which group students by ability tend to have lower overall average results and larger achievement gaps between rich and poor than those that provide for all students regardless on their socio-economic backgrounds. Continue reading “Comprehensive School Systems Do Better Than Selective Systems”

Shameful School Results Indict the Stanhope Government

The latest international test results put the Stanhope Government to shame. The new report of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) shows that education standards are declining and inequity is increasing in the ACT.

The results are disastrous. Average results have fallen and large achievement gaps between rich and poor continue unabated. These results are a grave social injustice and threaten the high skill base on which the local economy depends. They demand a new approach to education policy and funding.

Continue reading “Shameful School Results Indict the Stanhope Government”