Gonski Funding Will Future Proof Access to Quality Education

As a young man in his new country, he is entitled to access quality education locally. He has come to Australia as a 17 year old refugee without family of any description and often has home utilities cut off. Yet through a personalised learning program which is appropriately resourced, his life experience possibilities and opportunities are now much richer.

Purposeful, targeted and strategically planned resourcing will, can and does provide significant learning opportunities for our students most in need. The education funding reform has been expertly and fairly developed. Continue reading “Gonski Funding Will Future Proof Access to Quality Education”

The Case for Gonski Plus Funding Loadings for Low SES Students

This is the text of a new education research brief published by SOS. The references are available in the downloadable version below. The brief has been submitted to the review of the low SES loadings being conducted by the Federal Government. Continue reading “The Case for Gonski Plus Funding Loadings for Low SES Students”

Uninvited Submission Calls for Gonski Plus Funding Loadings for Disadvantaged Students

An uninvited submission from Save Our Schools to the Federal Government’s selective consultation on the Gonski funding loadings for disadvantaged students has called for the loadings to be increased. National Convenor, Trevor Cobbold, said that research studies show that the current loadings are far too low to be effective and should be at least doubled. Continue reading “Uninvited Submission Calls for Gonski Plus Funding Loadings for Disadvantaged Students”

Review of Low SES Loadings Should be Public

The following is a letter to The Australian about the secret review of the low SES funding loadings that was not published

Education Minister Pyne has made it clear that it is his prerogative and that of his Department to decide which interest groups and agencies will be invited to a review, behind closed doors, of the funding to be provided to students in schools serving t he neediest students.

Even if we accept this and the fact that submissions from those not on the list of invitees will not be considered, this does not explain why the submissions from the invitees are not being put up on the Department’s website for public scrutiny.

Whether it be the review of loadings for the neediest students, or of the national curriculum or initial teacher education, failure to make submissions public undermines public confidence and trust in the process and the outcomes.

Lyndsay Connors

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Public is Not Invited to Low SES Funding Loadings Review

The Federal Government has confirmed that its review of the low SES funding loadings is not open to the public and is confined to selected invitees. Trevor Cobbold, National Convenor of Save Our Schools, said today that SOS has received formal notification from the Federal Department of Education that it is not invited to make a submission on the loadings. Continue reading “Public is Not Invited to Low SES Funding Loadings Review”

Save Our Schools Calls for Submissions on Gonski Funding Loadings for Low SES students

Earlier this week, Federal Education Minister, Christopher Pyne, was sprung trying to sneak through a review of funding loadings for low SES students in a secretive process that was divulged only to selected stake-holders, who were overwhelmingly from private school organisations [The Australian, 9 September]. Under pressure from outraged public school organisations, the Government has moved to open up the enquiry, and has extended the submission date from today to the end of the month.

However, true to form, the Government has made little effort to tell anyone apart from the biased group of selected stake-holders that these changes have been made. The review is publicised only on a restricted part of the Federal Department of Education website which is not readily accessible without knowing about the review. Nevertheless, at least the review is now taking on some resemblance of a genuine review process. Continue reading “Save Our Schools Calls for Submissions on Gonski Funding Loadings for Low SES students”

Funding for Low SES Students is Under Threat by Secret and Biased Consultation

Save Our Schools today condemned the Federal Government for secrecy and biased representation of private schools in its consultation on the Gonski funding loadings for low SES students which closes tomorrow. SOS National Convenor, Trevor Cobbold, said that the secret consultation on the loadings is extremely unrepresentative and threatens future funding for low SES students. Continue reading “Funding for Low SES Students is Under Threat by Secret and Biased Consultation”

It is the Funding Stupid: Fixing Remote Indigenous Student Attendance

The Commonwealth has recently announced yet another Remote Schools Attendance Strategy focused on improving attendance through the funding of a cadre of school attendance officers and supervisors in identified communities across Australia. In fact it is one of the very few initiatives focusing on Indigenous students that the Commonwealth is continuing to fund.

Attendance is also a key priority for the Northern Territory Government (NTG). The NTG has recently published for final report of Bruce Wilson’s extensive Review of Indigenous Education in the Northern Territory called “A Share in the Future”. This Report underscores the importance of continuing to focus on improvements to attendance in spite of poor progress and makes a number of related recommendations. Continue reading “It is the Funding Stupid: Fixing Remote Indigenous Student Attendance”

Money Matters in Education

One of the strongest criticisms of the Gonski funding plan is that it failed to provide sound evidence that increased funding would lead to better student outcomes. It was widely claimed that research evidence shows that the relationship between per-student spending and student performance is weak [National Commission of Audit 2014a, 2014b, Ergas 2014, Justmann & Ryan 2013, Prasser & Tracey 2013, Public Policy Institute 2012, Sloan 2012].

Continue reading “Money Matters in Education”